Well-Rounded – The Crucible

Notes“Stop thinking and just write”, I kept telling myself and yet my review of the whole Crucible experience was not coming. It was sitting shapelessly somewhere between my guts and my heart, possibly also stuck sideways in my throat. A strange kind of reluctance catches hold of me every time I have been subjected to one of those close(r) encounters of the fangirling kind and I need to recount the event for my blog. I am rarely ever speechless, but it seemed like that with my trip to London to see The Crucible live on stage. And not for the awesome acting and impressive staging of the play. But possibly more for the inner condition of the fangirl. By committing the experience to paper/screen, the experience is anchored as an event of the past. And how nice would it be to hold on to the present and presence of the memory for a little while longer?

But move on we must, and with four pages of notes, breathlessly scribbled between 1 and 2 am in the morning last Saturday, I at least have a few pointers to fall back on. Although: Let’s face it – it has all been said and done. The experts have reviewed The Crucible and given it the official seal of approval with unanimous five-star labels. Numerous fans have added their unique perspective on the experience of seeing the play via blogs, comments and tumblrs. Is there any need for another gushing take on seeing R___ A___ acting live on stage? Eh yes. Because there was more to see in the play than the object of our interest in a shirtless scene – which for me ran danger of paradoxically obscuring the impact of the play despite de-robing the main character. But well, that is probably the obstinate fangirl in me speaking. As a theatrical experience, The Crucible hit on many levels, and here’s why: It was a well-rounded performance and production whose cast and crew matched perfectly in the quality of their individual contribution.

The “well-rounded” metaphor is obvious, considering that the play is performed in the round. The “round” theme is emphasised even further as soon as the first actor enters the sparsely decorated stage. In a dim space, with the low hum of indefinable music and wisps of smoke obscuring the stage, the atmosphere is created for a harrowing tale when servant Tituba circles the stage with heavy footsteps. Even if you didn’t know the play beforehand – it is clear that what will follow will not be light entertainment but demand the audience’s attention.  I will spare you yet another synopsis of the  play and focus on the points that I found particularly interesting in this production of The Crucible.

programme

Set, Light and Music

Soutra Gilmour has already been praised for the pared-back set design that is perfectly adequate as a backdrop for the action. It provides all the props needed to perform the action believably while not distracting from the words, movement and interaction of the characters on stage. But I am surprised that I have seen so little mention of the absolutely fabulous lighting design by Tim Lutkin. For most of the play the designer has been very careful to avoid light-spill unto the rows of seats where the audience sit. From where I was situated (second row) I only ever saw the first row around the stage, evoking the round again, creating a boundary,  and simultaneously adding a feeling of claustrophobia to the mix. In the dark atmosphere of the play, light is used sparsely but extremely effectively. I absolutely loved the effect of the strong light shining up through a trap door on the stage (acting as a staircase to the ground-floor of Rev. Parris’s house). The smoke in the auditorium catches the light in sharp, strong lines. When the girls visiting Betty Parris stand at the staircase, looking down, the light catches strongly on their faces. They are eerily illuminated from below, reminding you of hellfire and damnation, an effective implication of the offense they are about to commit. – Similarly, in the Proctor house, the safety of the home is evoked by homely flickering candle-light and a cozy, real (!) open fire burning in a fire basket on stage. Proctor adds to it with the lantern he carries inside – he is the light in the darkness, so to speak, a handy one-stop characterisation of his role in the play. The coziness ends after the interval when the play switches to the court and the stage is suddenly illuminated much brighter than before. This also draws more of the audience into the visible round, turning them from silent witnesses into spectators in the court session (further emphasised by the actors decidedly looking at the audience, as if they are attendees at the court). The light goes dim again for the prison scenes and the finale where Proctor and wife are the shining lights among the darkness. I loved all of the subtle enhancements through the lighting, but I concede that that is probably something a photographer is particularly sensitive to.

While much praise had been given to the music of Richard Hammarton, I have to say that I did not care much for it. Yes, it is adequately eerie and yet subtle, but music, however discreet, is an easy evoker of emotion. I felt slightly manipulated by that. And patronized. I can discern the atmosphere of a scene on my own, thank you very much. If I want music, I’ll go to Les Mis. I wanted to concentrate on the words and the action unfolding in front of my eyes. Having said that, the music didn’t really distract. It merely added a layer that seemed unnecessary and too much.

Movement and Humour

Another thing that really stood out for me was the movement choreography by Imogen Knight. The characters seemed to have been given their own distinctive, dynamic physicality: The girls were highly energetic, bouncy, very fast, nervous like fillies. Proctor, on the other hand, bounced the stage heavily like a bull, possibly and deliberately impeded by his heavy boots. Aside: has anyone given credit to RA for wearing those boots without socks??? *ouch* Might explain the less than aesthetic look of his feet… He takes  large steps, striding across the stage, has sweeping gestures. His choreography is like a deep roar – threatening but also confident, slow, languid and bullish. His wife’s movements, on the other hand, are pared-back, delicate, averted, like a quiet whisper. Reverend Hale goes through a remarkable movement change from sweeping and grand to fragile and scared. Putnam’s bowing and scraping acts almost like comic relief in the play.

Talking of comic relief – there was a good bit of that in the play, something that I had forgotten and not expected. There were many audible chuckles from the audience, something which I didn’t find inappropriate despite the moralistic tone of the play. The gentle humour of Proctor secretly adding salt to the food in the pan and then complimenting his wife on her well-seasoned cooking, Hale’s quip about the weight of wisdom in his stack of books and Corey’s jokes to the judges made the characters more human, more contemporary and easier to identify with. I think the audience was grasping at the rare instances of humour as the realisation became clearer and clearer where this would end.

The “Important” Bit

As for the performance of the man himself – I doubt anyone could be unaffected by R___ A___’s turn as John Proctor. Much of that is due to the role itself. Proctor is the hero. Human, with mistakes and faults, but despite that essentially the only consistently decent soul and rational thinker in the play. With most of the scenes involving Proctor’s presence, he is the most visible character, has the most interesting character arc and most scope for showing the extremes of emotion. And boy did he do that well. I was afraid that the roaring and shouting that many reviewers had mentioned beforehand would obscure the power of the words. Often I find that raised voices in theatre are a cheap trick. Shouts convey drama and attract attention – it is much harder to communicate that without a raised voice. But there was less shouting than I thought, and where the voices were raised, they were understandably so and not for overemphasizing the drama. Nonetheless the five-week run had clearly taken a toll on A___’s voice. His usually so smooth baritone was just that little bit raspy, especially when he had to roar. But the raspiness added to the characterisation of Proctor in a good way: His husky voice had a moving effect as it sounded broken and genuinely scared. There was no vocal overacting imo.The roaring remained impressive, matching the scary, angry face very well. It was a voice with a beard, so to speak.

RehearsalsHowever, it was the quiet scenes where I loved A___ as Proctor most, the heart-breaking small gestures in the scenes between Proctor and his wife. The attempt to kiss her in the scene in their house, the pleading invitation to go for a walk were accompanied by subdued, hesitant body language. If you had not understood any word, you would have read in the way Proctor moves around his wife that he is a man who is pleading for forgiveness, who deeply loves his wife, and who is desperate to win her back. That was the scene that touched me most – and where I could feel that Elizabeth Proctor is not a cold, distant wife who is sitting on the high horse of moral superiority judging her husband for his adultery but simply a heart-broken woman. Anna Madeley was beautifully understated in that role, her fragile frame, her quiet voice, her measured movements absolutely perfect to characterise a woman who has lost the confidence in her husband, herself and the sentiments that a marriage is built on. – Likewise, the final kiss between husband and wife as they find their love in the sacrifice of Proctor’s life was stunning. I had expected it would be tender and full of regret, even grief, but this kiss was life-affirming, sensual and passionate. What a legacy!!! This was one of the moments in the play where I blubbered inconsolably and completely forgot that it was R___ A___ acting on the stage, and only John Proctor was visible. However, the use of the North&South hands-on-face gesture was noted *ggg*.

As for the shirtless scene – that unfortunately distracted me from Proctor and brought A___ to the fore. I can’t really blame the actor for being the object of my fangirling, and maybe I would’ve been less distracted had not the scene taken place literally right in front of my seat, center front stage. There was a palpable gasp and nudge between the two ladies sitting to my left (I consciously restrained myself from doing the same to my companion on the right – *phew* the things we do in the name of art…). But I almost wished that he had kept his kit on. Having a wash as you come home from a day’s toiling in the fields certainly adds to the domestic setting of the scene, but the audible ovary popping in the audience slightly obscured the quiet dignity that was meant to be conveyed. Having said that – A___  displayed a nice physique and looked adequately muscular for a labouring man. A bit soft in places, but attractively so. Like a *real* man, not the wispy showbiz God of Berlin. Congenial casting and impressive body-shaping *ggg*

All of the Awards

When the play was over, the audience pretty  much leapt to their feet immediately. And rightly so. It is worth all of the five stars, a truly memorable staging of The Crucible with an amazing cast, each and every one of them. All of the awards, as they say!

Standout performers: A____, of course, but also Anna Madeley, Adrian Schiller as Reverend Hale (compellingly convincing), Natalie Gavin as Mary Warren (perfectly playing the scared and easily bullied victim that turns to attack in self-defense), Ann Firbank as Rebecca Nurse (calm, dignified, filling the role and the whole stage with warmth).

cast

 

177 thoughts on “Well-Rounded – The Crucible

  1. All the more reasons to go! I would have gone, had I looked better for a job! *bitter crying*
    All these amazing reviews do make me want to spend all the money that I have left, and go see him, because I know it would be worth it. Pity.

    I am really glad you enjoyed yourself, and your words, while very informative, made me smile. You can feel these strong feelings you do when seeing someone you deeply admire perform before your very eyes through them. Lovely.

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    • Bundy (ok if I shorten your name? Sign of affection! ;-)) – I do believe it would have been worth seeing the play live. But being the inimitable Goody Positivity :-D, let me tell you that RL goes before fan-ship. Even if you haven’t seen all three and a half hours of TC, what you *have* seen in terms of theatre stills, poster, and video, what you have heard RA say in interviews, the reviews by pros and fans, they all pretty accurately recreate the play. Or at least Richard’s part in it. Honestly, I think, if you were to take the script of TC and read it, filling the characters in your head with the shape of the actors we have seen in images, you can conjure it up in your head.
      Yes, it is special to see someone you admire act live in front of you. And who knows what happens in the future? Broadway seems to be an ambition, and you will be closer to that then. Meanwhile let’s bask in the warm flood of RA news that we get day by day 🙂

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      • Of course you can *beaming*! Though that doesn’t sound very dwarvish anymore ;).
        I reckon you’re right, as far as I can recall. I read quite a lot of reviews concerning TC,
        some of them being very detailled, so I can quite place the main pieces on the chessboard. Watching interviews helps, too.
        Nothing compares to seeing our “powerful leader” in the flesh, though, but I really appreciate this taste of Goody Positivity.
        Yay! swimming in it like a happy fish, even, mostly thanks to you :). By the way, I read about it,
        but I still don’t have a clue as to how to address it. I’d like to purchase a script (if possible??),
        a programme as well as a poster, and I have the address of the Old Vic, but how do I ask then pay for the whole package?

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        • Sorry for belittling you well-chosen name 🙂 I’ll go back to Bundushathur :-D.
          As for programme and poster – well, I am sure you could just ring or e-mail the Old Vic and ask them? Or go via their FB page? If it’s not a goer, I am happy to get the desired programme and poster for you as I am heading back to London in September. No idea how you can get your hands on a script, though, unless you mean the Miller text in general.

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  2. Wonderful review, S! I’ll be seeing it Sep 5 and 6, so I’ve tried to avoid detailed most reviews, but I had to read yours. Love your take on the lighting and de-robing of Mr A because I appreciate your photographer’s eye and perspective. 🙂 And his “voice with a beard” is a perfect description of the current sound of his voice. Can’t wait to experience it myself!

    So can we expect a post about your stage-door experience??

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    • Thanks, Susie – you are in for a fantastic experience! I took the same approach as you and avoided most reviews before I went to see the play. I am slightly sorry that I may have spoiled some of the play’s subtle effects… but you will see it from your unique POV and no doubt find other outstanding parts in the play.
      Re. stage door experience. I was hoping to draw the veil of silence over that *ggg*. An experience that I am genuinely torn about. Knowing myself I won’t be able to keep mum about it, though. To be posted at some stage, soon.

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  3. I love the layers you’ve added to the story of The Crucible experience. If I close my eyes, I can almost see it. Thank you Guylty for pushing through the writer’s block and allowing your thoughts to turn to memories. ♥

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    • That’s a nice way of putting it – turning thoughts into memories. And having done that, it is actually less painful than I thought 😉 And thanks for the idea. I could close my eyes, too 😀

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  4. Pingback: Guylty’s review of The Crucible! | Me + Richard Armitage

  5. G, I enjoyed this immensely! You mentioned details that I don’t recall hearing before (and I didn’t think it could be done at this point! ) I especially enjoyed hearing more about the lighting, music, and movement (as well as N&S reminder in the kiss 😉 and your thoughts about the shirtless scene. I admit I’ve had cynical thoughts about the inclusion of this as a blatant “bums in seats” move (while if I could go, I can’t claim I wouldn’t look forward to it 🙂 Thanks so much for sharing!

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    • I felt slightly prudish for being critical of the shirtless scene. Hey, I like to drool over the bod as much as the next fangirl (and I have the posts to prove it :-D). Maybe I was overcompensating for being a fan. It’s alright and it doesn’t stand out sorely in the play. It sets the scene.
      And I am glad if I have added a new dimension to the range of reviews so far.

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      • Oh, yeah! In truth, doesn’t really stick either for me to accuse Farber (who would really make these decisions I think) of looking to the cash register too close, when the previews pushed her so hard re: the length of the play and the shortening was really minimal. Like I say, if I went I’d be really disappointed if that scene were pulled…. did I mention “REALLY disappointed”? 🙂

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  6. Thank you for this. I have read many, many reports of this play and it’s impact, but it is somehow different when it’s coming from someone I know a bit better than I do others who’ve written. 🙂

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    • Totally agree. I was particularly interested in the reviews by the fans I am familiar with, because you can better gauge their reaction. Looking forward to a few more of those…

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  7. This review is so satisfying to me, Guylty – for its detail on some of the crafts we haven’t heard much of before ( I did read about the lighting, but not in such a descriptive way). That one of us can forget the actor on the stage is Richard Armitage, speaks volumes. Thanks again for part 1. 🙂

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    • Cheers, Perry. I really wanted to shine a light on some of the contributing crew members, if you pardon the pun. As for forgetting RA – only in places, not all the way. That is something that bugs me big time, but it is unfair to blame him for it. I had experiences like that before with other big-name actors.
      Part 2? *whistles innocently* Not sure what you are talking of *ggg*

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  8. So, jetzt isses raus. Well done, you’re a brave girl 🙂
    Mal schnell chronologisch: “If I want music, I’ll go to Les Mis”. Was soll ich sagen, wir wollten Musik und waren danach in Les MIs :-). Dann Thema Socken und Füsse: War da irgendwo was? Kann mich garnicht erinnern! Those bloody ankles, *shudder* .
    Beim Lesen des Stückes habe ich eigentlich auch keinen Humor gefunden, fand aber dass es in der Umsetzung tatschlich Spurenelemte davon gab. Wobei mir nur verhalten humoristisch zumute war. Eben weil man weiß, worauf es hinausläuft. Und dann unser half-naked boy: “a bit soft in places” = Zustimmung pur (Love-Handles?) ! Genau das Exemplar fürs heimische Sofa. Nicht zu abgehoben, aber es hängt auch nichts unnötig rum. Ich war stark realistisch angetriggert 😀
    Klingt schon wie ein gelungenes Erlebnis. DIe Erinnerung bleibt. SURE!

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    • 😀 Ja, den Exkurs über die Füße kannst *du* dir zuschreiben.
      Und agreed, das Stück war nicht humoristisch, und ich hab wenig lachen können, aber ich fand die Reaktion des Publikums, nach den Spuren des Humors wie nach einem Rettungsring zu greifen, irgendwie verständlich.
      Realistisch angetriggert? Absolut. Genau das war mein Gedanke. Mit “real man” meinte ich auch weniger so ein Alpha Male-Exemplar aus dem Bilderbuch, sondern einen “realistischen” Mann – stark und beschützerisch, aber auch mit Schwächen – auch körperlichen *ggg*. Er sah irgendwie “echt” aus. Nicht wie ein Halbgott.
      Das Erlebnis war gelungen. Ich würd’s jederzeit wieder tun 😀

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    • Thanks fitzg – since I read so few reviews I had no idea how much I was regurgitating. I guess I ought to catch up now. But at least we all agree on the essentials – fabulous play, impressive performance. Well worth seeing.

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  9. It is very difficult to let go of personal memories and send them out into the world to become shared moments. You did a wonderful job telling us the story of your experience … not only what you saw, but what you thought and felt, as well! Thanks for sharing it with us. If anything, I’m a little more green right now 😉

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    • You are giving me the benefit of your indulgence, Zan. Attention hogger that I am, the sharing of the memory is a way to receive feedback. Well, I hope I have also given some insights by selfishly doing so. And green is a lovely colour *says the girl from the Emerald Isle*. I was quite green when you were at the NY Pinter/Proust event. I daresay I lived that event through your eyes, too! So thanks back to you! ❤

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  10. It’s a very well-rounded review, guylty! Especially as you had to process the emotions, which I’m sure are complex. Great insight into the play… You make the man sound real, thank you for that.

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    • Ha, not sure whether the review was well-rounded. By definition, a fan-review probably can’t be. But so be it. 🙂 If I have made him sound real, then my intention has been accomplished. Thanks for reading and commenting so kindly! ❤

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  11. You aced it.I felt I was there.I live in the states,so I will probably never see it.{DVD Please}Oh well,I’ll put on my Daniel day-Lewis Crucible and make believe I am in London…LOL..

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    • I haven’t seen the DDL version of TC (have only heard that the ending there was made to suit Hollywood???). So my recommendation is to spend an hour looking at all available footage and stills photography and then read the play, filling the figures on the page with the shapes of the actors in this production. Works! Thanks for commenting dede 🙂

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  12. All the interesting and intelligent comments of the photographer with this unique touch of the fan girl that belongs only to you. Perfect. But still waiting for the comments of Pop Thorin !!!

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    • Hehe, you’re honing in on the ex-camera experience at the stage door. A completely different type of review coming up for that 🙂 Still processing it and wondering how to put it. Thanks, Katia ❤

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  13. After reading your review, I am now wishing that I could go and see the play. You should consider writing a 10,000 word review. Then those of us who could not attend would be able to do so through your words. Thanks, lovely review. ^_^

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    • You have no idea what you are saying Rabbit *ggg*. I am capable of waffling on biblical scale! With a tendency to write pretentious half-wisdom. I probably could’ve extended and expanded a good bit, but really, it would’ve really played on your patience and indulgence. Thanks for commenting so kindly!

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    • Thanks for waiting and commenting, simplegirl :-). Oh, believe me, I could’ve expanded on that kiss a bit more. But I already felt I was turning the review into a proper piece of uncritical fangirl celebrity worship… Hm, but now that I know what the readers want, I’ll pander to my audience at the next opportunity 😀

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  14. Cheers, what a well-rounded read! Really great! Love this, Guylty!! You actually filled in some of the gaps that (maybe) were left in a home-made summary of all the other reviews so far. Now we all can have an even more detailed impression of the play taking place in The Old Vic.
    I do so understand your description of being left speechless, of about being considerably overwhelmed by this emotionally charged event, overloaded not only with our fangirls’ expectations, wishes and dreams that can hardly be avoided, completely – MPOV ;-)) ….sitting shapelessly somewhere between my guts and my heart – what an apt way to depict that hard to describe feeling rumbling about inside.. !!
    As a result, your report scales up my anticipation even more… If that is possible anyway….. Thanks, for letting go and sharing your experience with us.
    Talking of the legacy. The Kiss, something to hold on to, right??

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    • I hope you can forget my review again, Linda, and see the play in your own unique way. I am sure you will have interesting things to say, what with your intimate knowledge of theatre. Can’t wait to discuss that with you, actually.
      As for the expectations and the emotional charge – I was surprisingly cool, calm and collected in the run-up to the play. The previous reviewers had done their bit in assuaging any worry that I might have had about Mr A not being up to scratch. My expectations were less focussed on his abilities as a performer per se, and more on my own ability to *forget* who I was seeing on stage. It didn’t quite work, but that’s down to me.
      Re. legacy – kiss. Yeah, pretty evocative and etched into memory. It was an amazing emotional statement imo. So simple a device, but wow. And I am not saying this as a fangirl but as a human. Half the relationship of John and Elizabeth was in that kiss. Inspired!

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      • Oh no, No way! I do not cast doubt on RAs’ performing abilities. My expectations are more concerning the “whole package” (being in London, spending loads of money for tickets, the thrill of anticipation and the ongoing general excitement over the last months!) My idea is, seeing him play in the flesh might be distracting…. Die Frage ist nur, von was????? :D.

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        • Oh I see. Well, the journey is the goal. It’s all part of the experience. And in my case, it now seems as if I am always throwing obstacles into my experience. For Berlin I missed my flight. This time I had a nasty fall the day before I set off to London and hurt my hip. For a brief moment I thought I was going to have to hire a wheelchair to get around London. Luckily the pain subsided eventually. But yeah, something tells me that the universe is making me work hard for my hobby *ggg*

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  15. *sigh* Your review has one serius fault… it ends very quickly (oh,sorry for whining!)
    I really appreciate you work,Guylty 🙂 Thank you very much!

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    • That comment gave me a serious fright, Joanna. Well, luckily I am in the habit of reading my “reviews” to the end 😉 Thanks for that nice compliment 🙂

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  16. What a way to start my day! Everything I feel has already been said in the comments (one of the drawbacks of being down under!) but I want to say anyway, what a fabulous review Guylty. I love the mix of technical and critical descriptions with the occasional fangurly thought thrown in – a well rounded review of a well rounded play indeed!
    I am one of those who has been building a picture in my head of the play through the stills, video and reviews, and now I can add the details you have provided so well, especially the N&S reference in The Kiss between the Proctors. More please! 😉
    Try not to be too hard on yourself for being unable to completely lose sight of RA on the stage, although I understand perfectly where you are coming from. He is the reason you were there, or would you have seen the play without him?

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  17. Loved your review with the unique observations you gave us. Thank you so much for the “fan girl” moments along with the insights into the production that don’t include Richard. I don’t know how you managed it , but your objectivity is intact and well as your fandom cred. I really appreciated how you back up your impressions with specific details. Way to go!

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  18. Guylty, From the official stills and sneaky candids by audience members, the stage lighting was one of the elements that really interested me, so I’m pleased that you touched upon it–no surprise given your keen photographer’s eyes. Your description of the sparse, dramatic lighting along with the use of smoke reminds of Caravaggio’s murky “tenebroso” effect.

    I hope to see the play and will know in one weeks time if I’m able to fly from LA to London for a whirlwind trip. Fingers and toes crossed!

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    • Tenebrism – oh yes. You could describe some of the lighting in the play that way, certainly the scene that I described in detail was lit that way. And that is, btw, also one of the reasons for having the auditorium filled with smoke. Otherwise the light would not have been caught at all (apart from on the actors’ faces.)
      OMG – and you are flying in to London for the play? Congratulations! I can assure you it is worth it. BTW – the theatre is very easy to find, on Waterloo Road, 5 minutes away from Waterloo Station (tube exit onto Waterloo Road). Turn right out of the station and cross the road and you will be almost immediately there.
      Looking forward to hearing your opinion!!!

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  19. Hi guylty, love your report! I felt transported back to the breathless intensity of watching this amazing production. So may I join the queue asking for the 10.000+ one? I’d be interested in your uptake of the many connotations of the staging for instance.
    Example: the bread-kneading scene followed up by the “shirtless” one are two halves of one marriage story of frustrated sexuality, full of intense yearning and loneliness incarcerated in misunderstanding and hurt feelings. It felt uncomfortable watching as it layed both of them bare and we (the audience) were made into unwilling voyeuristic witnesses. – At least that was my uptake. 😉 How did you interpret the beginning? And please, write the longer report 🙂

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    • Hi Fufi – welcome to my blog. And thank you for a great prompt. In re-reading my review I find that I left out soooo much. I hardly talked about Yael Farber at all, which is rather a big omission, considering that she has created this interpretation of the play. And yes, symbolic scenes of importance, such as the beginning (I take it you are not referring to Tituba’s circling of the stage but to the first scene in Betty Parris’s bedroom? There is another shameful omission…).
      Will have to collect my thoughts (and bring out the notebook again :-D)
      Thanks for commenting!

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  20. *seufz* Nein, ich bin gar nicht neidisch … Grün ist meine normale Gesichtsfarbe. 😉

    Danke für den tollen, wenn auch viel zu kurzen Bericht. Ich schließe mich dem Chor an: ZU-GA-BE! ZU-GA-BE!!

    PS: Tintenschreiber oder Füller?

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    • Leute, ihr wisst nicht, was ihr da sagt. Ich kann endlos sülzen :-D. Doch wirklich – wo ist der Bus??????
      PS: Füller, natürlich! Man hat ja schließlich Stil 😀

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      • Muss mich mal reinhängen: Moin Igelita, meine Neugier wieder: Thema Cross -over: in welchem Fandom warst du schon unterwegs ? Falls das nicht zu indiskret ist
        🙂

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          • Nein!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Echt jetzt, Igelchen? Ach, komm an mein Herz. Die Kerze ist zwar ausgeflammt, aber mit einem halben Auge gucke ich ja doch ganz selten noch mal hin. Ist aber ja auch ü-ber-haupt nichts mit los… Und schauspielerisch kann er nun wirklich Richard nicht mal im Entferntesten das Wasser reichen.
            PS: Gratulation zum hervorragenden Männer-Geschmack 😀

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            • Echt jetzt, Guylty. *gg* Ja, von Zeit zu Zeit checke ich auch, ob da was los ist, das mich interessieren könnte. *nostalgisch seufz* 😀
              Oh, Gratulation zurück. 😉

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              • Ich konnte es bisher noch nicht übers Herz bringen, mich von der gesamten Videographie zu trennen. Nicht, dass ich noch den Drang verspüre, mir das anzugucken… Ist heutzutage dann doch eher schmerzhaft, so im direkten Vergleich zu RA. Aber irgendwie hängt man ja dran…

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              • Was meinst du jetzt mit der “gesamten Videographie”? Bei seinen Sachen ist doch einiges dabei, dass man sich durchaus auch ohne Drooling-Anfälle angucken kann, einfach, weil’s gute Filme sind.

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                • Die DVD-Sammlung im Schrank… und ja, ein paar Dinger sind thematisch sehenswert. Und so ganz schlecht, wie ihn immer alle gemacht haben, isser ja nun nicht. Aber eben doch nicht so gut wie RA. Aber auch in seinem Fall war es eher die Persönlichkeit, die mich angezogen hat, als das exotische Äußere.

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              • Komplett hatte ich die Sachen nie, wenn auch ziemlich viel, glaube ich. Das meiste davon mag ich auch, also wird’s wohl im Schrank bleiben.

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                • Nee, bei mir auch nicht ganz komplett. Und gerade die Schmonzetten sind ja auch an einsamen Abenden ganz nett. Obwohl ich da eben dann doch lieber N&S einlege 😀

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              • Und ich gebe dir recht hinsichtlich Persönlichkeit und auch Fähigkeit als Schauspieler. So schlecht ist er nun wirklich nicht, wie manche sagen.

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              • Oje, jetzt riskiere ich wahrscheinlich mein Leben … Ich bin alles andere als ein Fan von Schmonzetten.
                Ehrlich.
                Ich habe auch N&S wegen Richard gesehen, wäre aber wohl nie wegen N&S zu Richard gekommen. *auf die BLASPHEMIE!!!-Schreie wart*

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                • 😀 Nö, N&S hatte mich ja auch eher kalt gelassen, weil ich das als Abklatsch und Aufguss von P&P empfand. Mich hat ja erst Spooks neugierig gemacht. Und mit Sir Guy hat er mich gekriegt. (Was dann allerdings auch eher in Richtung Schmonzette tendiert…)

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                  • Spannend , wann es jeden einzelnen packt. Mich hat er auf der emotional unterversorgten Schiene Ende 2013 via N&S kalt erwischt. Und dann wars zum GoG nicht mehr weit (Dank youtube ).

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              • Mir ist Thorin aufgefallen. Die Stimme war’s. Und dann habe ich mal geguckt, wer der Darsteller ist und was er sonst gemacht hat. Spooks klang interessant genug, um mal reinzuschauen. Tja, und das war’s dann …
                Ich hätte wissen müssen, dass Thorin mein Verderben sein wird. *theatralisch seufz*

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                • Konnte mir erst das mit dem Zwerg “garnicht” vorstellen, aber man wächst ja an seinen Aufgaben. Und nu isses passiert. Mittendrin und manchmal voll daneben.

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                • Also, Igelchen, ich fass es nicht. Das ist der Hö-he-punkt Armitag’scher Schauspielkunst *huströchel*. Naja. Aber eben eine ziemlich dankbare Rolle, höchst ramontisch und dank Nackenlöckchen und Lederoutfit dann auch massenkompatibel. Ich mein, du brauchst ja nur mal eben auf die Blogstartseite hier gehen und hast gleich im Profil auf dem Schirm. Dass du da noch nicht näher nachforschen musstest…

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              • Tja, auf Zwerge stehe ich ja eigentlich auch nicht … Also, vorher, meine ich. *gg*
                Aaaaaber … Es ist ja bekannt, dass das Beuteschema in der Kindheit angelegt wird, gelle? Und eines der männlichen Wesen in meiner Umgebung in diesem Alter war jemand namens Thoren (mit e, nicht i). Ich hatte also nie eine Chance. *gg*

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              • Also, ehrlich! Guylty, ich kenne selbstverfreilich Herrn Guy! Ich habe nur noch nicht die bewegten Bilder gesehen. – Kommt noch …

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              • Irgendwie könnte man fast glauben, dass es zwischen deinem Namen und deinem Bekehrungsdrang bzgl. Guy einen Zusammenhang gibt, Guylty. *gg*
                Keine Bange, ich werde den Herrn nicht imprägnieren, das verspreche ich. 😀

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              • Tja, da musst du nun mal ein bisschen recherchieren, meine Liebe :-D. Nichts ist umsonst im Leben *ggg* (Tipp: Steht ziemlich deutlich auf einer meiner Seiten :-D.)

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                • Boah, fühlte mich gerade irgendwie rausgemobbt 🙂
                  Dann werde ich mal heute nachmittag recherchieren, wenn ich wieder ordentlich am Rechner sitze. Den Spannungsbogen immer schon straff halten, richtig?

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                  • Merkt man mir an, dass ich mal im Bereich Marketing gearbeitet habe *unschuldigpfeif*.
                    Nix da mobben – das sind Herausforderungen der modernen sozialen Medien. Und der Litmus-Test der Follower: Wer hat meine Seite *wirklich* gelesen 😀

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                • Und dann fiel es ihr wie Schuppen aus den Haaren…., GOT IT LADIES:
                  Der aus’m Bus mit der Sandra B. . Klar hab ich das bei dir schon gelesen *triumphgeheul*
                  Fand ich auchmal ganz nett.

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                  • Bingo! 😀
                    Aber das Ratespiel hat doch auch Spaß gemacht, gell?
                    Nett anzusehen war er ja. (Ich hatte damals, als ich noch zur fest-angestellten workforce in besagter Marketingabteilung eines namhaften US-Internetunternehmens gehörte, eine Fotosammlung als Screenschoner auf meinem Firmen-PC laufen. War immer ein netter Gesprächsgegenstand *ggg*. Hier das ultimative *ooof*-Bild (possibly NSFW) http://images5.fanpop.com/image/photos/29300000/Keanu-Reeves-keanu-reeves-29312827-1722-2324.jpg

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                    • Das hat definitiv Spaß gemacht 🙂
                      Und das Bild, also puh ja, was soll ich sagen , *rutsch aufm Stuhl rum* SEHR arbeitsplatztauglich 😎
                      Da zieht’s den Blick aber mächtig südwärts! Möchte ich mir mit unserer späten Liebe garnicht vorstellen . RA als PinUp nur deutlich angezogener ( mit enger *hust* Hose und Hauptsache UnterArme frei / hihi da war’s wieder). Reicht komplett fürs erfolgreiche Kopfkino *schwelg*

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                  • Echt jetzt: die Arme sind Phallus-Symbole. Na also weißte. Haarig fällt mit in diesem Zusammenhang nur am Rande ein *auchverlegenrumhust*
                    Immer dieser Feinstaub…..

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                • Möchte echt mal wissen, warum das mit haarigen U-Armen so einen Reiz ausübt. Fahre doch auch nicht auf haarige Beine ab. Ist das was evolutionstechnisches? Symbol für Manneskraft? SEHR mysteriös.

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                  • Ich glaub, das hat was mit der Muskulösität von Unterarmen zu tun. Und der relativen Anfassbarkeit von Armen. Die Häärchen machen das haptische Vergnügen dann ja noch etwas aufregender 😀 Sehen in Fotos auch immer so schön dreidimensional aus. Da kommt einiges zusammen.

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                    • Geil, das hat hier was von der Sendung mit der Maus 🙂 “Unmittelbare Anfassbarkeit” , die sich an diese Hände (Achtung: neue Baustelle) anschließt. Ja 3D hat was, stimmt.

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                    • *hüstel*
                      Aber ja, wir können hier vom Höckschen aufs Stöckschen kommen. Bei sind es allerdings dann weniger die Extremitäten, sondern eher so das Schlüsselbein und der Brusthaaransatz. Das interpretiere nun einer *kicher*.

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              • Das ist doch ganz einfach zu interpretieren, Guylty: Es ist das, was man beim offenen Hemdkragen sehen kann, und es reizt ungemein, sich von dort aus auf Entdeckungsreise zu machen …

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                • Komisch, manchmal sieht man den Wald vor lauter Bäumen nicht… So wird’s sein. (Mir läuft irgendwie gerade das Wasser im Mund zusammen. Abort – abort! Exit conversation NOW!)

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      • Der Bus steht vor der deiner Tür mit der Aufschrift: “Busses welcome”
        🙂 Blöd gelaufen. Das Volk will Brot und Spiele! Selbst schuld, wer sich eine solches Gefolge großzieht 😉

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          • Nicht lügen! Uns interessiert dein Eindruck, egal, wie der ausgefallen ist. Schließlich ist es DEIN Eindruck, was Persönliches.

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            • Das schon. Aber man möchte das Fan-Erlebnis ja auch nicht für andere Leute versauen. Ui, das klingt schon ganz schlimm. War es gar nicht. Aber eben irgendwie nicht Fisch nicht Fleisch. Das hatte aber mehr mit meiner Befindlichkeit zu tun als mit seiner… Kommt aber hoffentlich heute im Laufe des Tages. Muss mal erst ein bisschen Internetnachrichten produzieren 😀

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              • Siehst du, das ist der Grund, warum ich unsicher bin, ob ich ihn treffen wollen würde, wenn ich denn die Gelegenheit hätte. Einerseits würde ich RA natürlich gerne aus der Nähe sehen, andererseits … Für ein Autogramm und maximal zwei gewechselte Worte? Ich fürchte, ich wäre enttäuscht.
                Wir träumen vielleicht von einem persönlichen Treffen, aber Stagedoor wird nie einem echten Kontakt nahekommen. – Klar, das weiß man vorher. Trotzdem …

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    • Some creative characterisation on my part 🙂
      And oh, that version of my handwriting you see there is the “sitting up in soft bed with notebook on wobbly knees scribbling frantically at 1 in the morning”-version. It’s usually much neater than that.

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      • A neatnik, eh? I have always wanted a beautiful, regular hand but sadly, it takes extreme effort for me. And in these digital days there are fewer and fewer opportunities for practice.

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        • That’s it, Linnet. In college I used to fill pages and pages of notes every day, in short hand. And they were legible and neat, well-structured and organised with my own system of abbreviations and sub-chapters. Now we all only type on laptops or swipe on smartphones. It was for that reason that I consciously took up note-writing again, two years ago. The notebook is where all my *ooof* research goes and where I sketch my shrine ideas. Keeping it neat and tidy means it is almost like a picture book. Plus, it is incredibly meditative writing with a fountain pen on smooth paper. Something about seeing the ink flow and forming symbols of meaning that together make text… adds to the creative experience. Bonus: the more you write, the better your hand-writing becomes again. 🙂

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  21. What everybody else said! Thank your for sacrificing the specialness of keeping this private and instead sharing it with us all. You’ve performed a public service, truly.

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  22. Now, let me see if blasted WP will be kind enough to let me leave a message this time. Thanks for going into such detail about all aspects of the production and helping those of us who can’t make it to the Old Vic feel as if we did get there and experience this amazing performance all around. Good things really do need to be shared, don’t they? And Mr. A is definitely a good thing. 😀

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    • Absolutely so, he is a good man (I think) and a good thing :-). It was quite interesting for me to write the review, too, remembering back to the various things that had stood out for me. And if it made the play more concrete or vivid for you and others who cannot see it for themselves, then that is even better. It was magnificent, and I cannot recommend it more. Certainly one of the few theatre experiences that I will never forget. And not only for Mr A.

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      • I truly do believe he is a good man, too. All evidence points in that direction. When I did a lot of Lifestyles stuff for the paper, I always tried to write the articles in such a way that those who didn’t get to attend would feel as if they had, and those who did would get to relive the experience in a way. And you’ve accomplished that here.

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  23. Oh, and thank you for bringing that up about the shouting. From some comments/reviews I had read, I feared it would all be too “shouty” for my tastes but after reading your review, those fears I have put to rest.

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      • The shouting can seem stagey to me, which sounds strange in this context because it IS, after all, a stage play. But, you know, that doesn’t mean I want to see (and hear) people chew the scenery, right? So really glad to hear your take on it all, that it worked.

        Liked by 1 person

  24. Thanks for the kind comments on my review of The Crucible. 🙂 Loved your review and I see we agree on a lot of things! I am now following your blog, and I will continue to visit as you write extremely well and the posts interest me massively. 🙂

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  25. Pingback: The Crucible – Second Time ‘Round | GUYLTY PLEASURE

  26. Pingback: DeRAnged Part 3: “De-RA’ed but Be-Muse’d” – A Reaction to Seeing RA Act | GUYLTY PLEASURE

  27. brilliant! still catching up as you can see. Great that you didn’t find it shouty either, i also thought that happened only at the appropriate times. You’re not alone in feeling distracted and annoyed at that 😉 BUT after that i went to the text and checked, Miller put it in the play, very specifically 🙂 So nobody got too creative there actually 😉 As he did the kiss, ie he specified that the kiss should be passionate, which i think is as you said brilliantly life affirming.
    (und ich bin auch uber dieses Foto gestolpert! ‘ggg’ Gott sei Dank furs Handtuch ;-)))

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  28. Pingback: [Scheduled] *ooof*: Light in the Dark | Guylty Pleasure

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