DeRAnged Part 4: A Conversation with Richard Armitage

[Wow, that sounds as if I had a conversation with Richard Armitage. Eh. No. But I was there at the conversation with Richard Armitage, organised by the Old Vic, on Tuesday September 2nd. And wow, did my stars align for that whole trip. Yay universe, I think we are in love again!!! Skip the first three paragraphs to get to the actual review/recount of the conversation event.]

Preliminaries

Did I say somewhere that people who watch a play more than once are nutters? Well, I had gone down Nutley Hill pretty early on. Even before I set out to meet Servetus at the end of August. I actually booked my ticket before I even saw the play for the first time. The reason being that my wonderful shrine fairy Kathy Jones was going to be in London for the play, too, and had suggested I join her. So yeah, I *only* booked another ticket for TC because Kathy needed a companion. Yeah right. It certainly was another fan meet opportunity that was just too good to pass by. Because when will I see those lovely American sisters-in-RA ever again?

But the stars aligned, I said, and they did, because shortly after booking my performance tickets, flights still to book, news broke on the 31st of July of the conversation with RA. This was obviously too good to be missed, and the date for the general release of the convo tickets after friends, patrons and sycophants of the Old Vic had been given several days priority for ticket purchases was pencilled into my diary. Frantic e-mailing ensued behind the scenes. I needn’t have worried. It pays to know the right people, I can only say, because I received an e-mail by Helen who was equally unable to resist attending the conversation and not only offered to get a ticket from the pre-public sale for me, but simply asked how many she should get out of her possible allocation of four. Needless to say I advised her to get all four *ggg*, and Kathy and Linda60 were the beneficiaries of this. By Monday the 4th of August (at which time I incidentally was still in London after seeing TC for the first time) we had scored the tickets. Yay, yay, yay!

The Conversation

So on Tuesday, 2nd September 2014 I made my way to London, hooked up with Helen, went to see Sarah Dunn’s “Wide Eyed” exhibition (to be addressed in a proper review), met with lots of fellow sisters-in RA in the afternoon (to be discussed tomorrow) and finally headed to the Old Vic for the conversation event. Since the conversation has been published as transcripts by Film and TV Now here and here, I will not recount the whole thing but only reconstruct my reactions to it on the basis of the notes I jotted down in the ever-trusty note-book that night.

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There was a wonderful buzz in the auditorium pre-event. The Old Vic appeared to be fully sold out, a great vote of confidence in the star of the conversation. Judging by appearances, the bulk of the audience was made up from fans, but there were a good few men present, too. We were sitting in Row L (which is the seventh row) on the left side. I was quite pleased to spot a camera by the coveted best seats in the house – F13 and 14 I’ll only say shirtless scene *ggg* – and took it as an indication that the recording was going to be made available eventually for those of my fellow friends and fans who couldn’t attend this. Amid the excited chatter of the audience, RA and the interviewer, London-based American theatre critic Matt Wolf appeared unannounced but to thunderous applause, whooping and whistling. Yeah, da fangirlz are in da house!  Without the customary introduction and bio but a little advertising spiel for a book about the Old Vic, Wolf plunged right into the conversation. A bit strange, if you ask me…

Throughout the 38 minute conversation (I timed it *ggg*) RA looked comfortable and happy to be there, and to answer questions. He didn’t squirm or cringe, except for comic relief, answering in-depth and very articulately. What really hit me immediately was the deep timbre of his voice, which I found nearly down to Thorin level, and very Proctor-ish. Was “he” there with him? Hearing his voice, as himself, was somehow really affecting. I felt shivers going down my arms. It affected me more than his voice during the play – maybe because in the play there is so much else you have to keep up with with your senses.

Not that there was nothing to see with the eyes *ggg*. A casually dressed RA, dark jeans, I think, a dark formal jacket, a casual t-shirt with a collar, trainers. Himself and Wolf were sitting on two chairs, an occasional table between them, centre stage. Luckily he was sitting stage left-ish, so his head was turned to our direction when he was looking at Wolf during the conversation. However, what most struck me during the convo was that Armitage was really addressing the audience with his answers. When talking he looked into the auditorium, letting his gaze flow over all the rows, up and down. Which drew each and every audience member in, I think, as if the conversation was one between him and each of us individually. Very effective – it communicated confidence, awareness and comfortableness. It made me instantly feel comfortable about being there, not a passive onlooker or voyeur, but an active listener.

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I loved the little bits and incidents of mutual understanding and connection between RA and his fans. Take this bit, for instance: In context with his previous knowledge and experience of the play as a drama student in his twenties , RA described his different insights into it with himself now a “42-year-old”. Much laughter ensued – because the man had turned 43 not long before, and the audience obviously knew about his slightly coquettish attitude to his age. Or later, when the conversation turned to the previously sent-in and vetted questions, and RA preluded his answer to fellow-tumblr sister-in-RA notallwhowanderarelost2’s question whether he would consider doing a musical or comedy  after finishing TC, with a wide grin and saying “Who asked that question???”. And especially the fact that he reads fan letters before his performances. Reassuring him? Giving him confidence? New insights? I thought it was a stroke of genius in terms of fostering star-fan relations that he had brought a fan letter along from which he quoted. (And of course I was doubly touched by it because it was from a German fan about the experience of living under a totalitarian regime that does not shrink back from instrumentalizing young children in order to gain information about dissident behaviour – a story I have heard many times, although I did not grow up in East Germany.) How nice to think that the many written messages to him may not vanish into thin air but do actually reach the addressee and even have an effect!!

The whole conversation was quite focussed though, and while addressing RA’s biography, his past experience with the play, how he decided on the part, his way of working, it did not really veer into his previous career landmarks but strictly stayed with TC. It was everything but boring, and it wasn’t necessarily “serious”, either, but it was certainly not as light-hearted and carefree as the Popcorn Taxi event in Sydney in 2013. For starters, the Australian interviewer Oscar Whatshisname was a bit more entertaining and faster of the cuff with reactions to the audience and to RA than Wolf. But maybe the Sydney event also had less stress attached. After all, the conversation was held on a day where RA was expected back on stage roughly an hour and a half after the end of the conversation. So the conversation stayed with the high-brow world of the theatre, the demanding play and the process of preparing for it.

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Under “general impression of RA” my notes say “a serious professional”. Or more evocatively in recorded thought:  “Wow. He loves this. He loves the whole process of it. He has thought it through. He is a Vollblutschauspieler.” That German word is so apt, I can not avoid using it. It means literally “a whole blood actor” or a “thoroughbred actor”. It implies that he is an actor through and through, that he lives and breathes acting, that he is passionate about and in his acting, and that he excels at what he does. I found him extremely reflective and honest on this particular role – he disclosed his fear about not living up to the role or for finding the last act extremely hard to play, being fearful of doing it. But also courageous for exactly the same reason – for taking on that challenge and testing the limits of his talents. And for allowing the play to overcome his resistance and propel him forward with every line. He equally appeared as a rational being who tries to understand the various impulses and influences he encounters as well as a man needing emotional stimulation in order to fulfill his job to the max. The latter I took from hearing that music has such strong effect on him, that he uses the music of Pärt, Darling and Penderecki as part of his preparation. Oh, and I actually also thought “Pretentious git!!!” when I heard about his choice of music *ggg*.

I loved how he has an almost personal relationship with Proctor. He quoted from Miller’s description of Proctor as an earnest, earthy man and admitted “When I first met him, I felt like a fool”. The whole bit about his trip to Salem in the spring literally gutted me. Just the way he got to know Proctor by seeing his property, his land, hit me right in the stomach. The character was a real person, is a real person, and RA has respectfully done all he can to find him and to represent him truthfully and thus do justice to him. Wow. That part was really evocative – the way RA connected lines from the play with recounting his trip. “I can close my eyes and I know where he was seated, I know where he’s been, especially when he says ‘I have been planting seeds near the forest edge’.” or “Where John says ‘Massachusetts looks beautiful in the spring’ I know what that looks like because I went there in that moment, when the sun was setting. I saw the place where Proctor’s house was, I saw the brook that runs by his field, I saw the clearing in the woods where supposedly the girls danced and the pathway where Proctor walked from Salem village to Salem town.”

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There were other details about his way of working that really impressed me – particularly the fact that he ritualistically switches off the lights a quarter of an hour before the play to sit in the dark. To clear his mind, presumably, and zone in on Proctor, or inviting Proctor to visit him? I was struck by that oversensitivity of the artist, the way he seems to see Proctor as an invisible but existing presence, a soul maybe, that visits him in his? Hence he has to be respectful to this presence whom he is representing, and he can’t just shrug him off at the end of the night because that would be rude to Proctor. Maybe he employs him as his bodyguard, too, I thought to myself, because he comes out at the SD still with Proctor inside, and Proctor is like a filter through which RA apparently has difficulties seeing the nutters enthusiasts who are waiting for him to make an appearance. How convenient… 😉

I could have listened to RA for much longer, it almost came as a shock when it was over. The insights into his way of working were fascinating, they were exactly the sort of thing I would ask if I happened to sit next to him at dinner. (But I’d probably be a bit cheekier and more entertaining than Wolf along the way she says arrogantly.) He came across as an articulate, intelligent, reflective sort of man, not full of himself, but full of his art/craft. And happy to talk about that, to share the enthusiasm. Not in a proselytising or condescending way but somehow benignly sharing his approach and his own conclusions. I came out of it thinking “I am impressed!”(despite the gitty pretentiousness of his music preferences *ggg*). And with a renewed crush on the man, I am afraid to say. The muse was firmly elbowed out of the way when RA made an appearance as himself. “Armitage was his wonderful loveable self. Witty, funny, intelligent, thoughtful, talented, reflected, gorgeous”, is how I put it in an e-mail to a friend. Note that “gorgeous” is right at the end of the list, because what makes the man so attractive is not his chest hair or his peaches or his smoulder. It’s all the other attributes first. I’ll repeat again what Abby/Awkward Celebrity said: There’s a light on upstairs. Totally agree. May the power never be cut off!

60 thoughts on “DeRAnged Part 4: A Conversation with Richard Armitage

  1. Der Vollblutschauspieler! Danke für Deine Eindrücke – thanks for your report! Ich hoffe, er hört zwischendurch mal etwas “more light-hearted music” ;-).
    Mir gefällt die Art und Weise, wie er sich zur Zeit präsentiert, sehr gut! Incl. der social media!
    Chapeau, Mr Armitage!

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    • Bitte, gerne 🙂 Also, wenn der Mann sich nur diese atonale Geräuschmusik gibt, dann habe ich größte Besorgnis für seinen Gemütszustand :-D… Aber er hört ja auch wohl gerne Acid Jazz und Rhythm & Blues… Dann ist ja für Ausgleich gesorgt.
      Ja, er ist sehr sehr gut in der Präsi. Hat aber ja wohl auch die entsprechenden Berater dazu. Mit der SM bin ich noch nicht ganz so im Einklang, aber ich merke, dass sich mein Unwillen da auch so langsam abschleift… Den Chapeau ziehe ich aber trotzdem gemeinsam mit dir.

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  2. Pingback: As the productions winds to a close, more reactions to Richard Armitage, The Crucible | Me + Richard Armitage

  3. Danke, dass Du uns an dieser intensiven Erfahrung teilhaben lässt – wünscht´ ich wäre wirklich dabei gewesen, aber mit Deinem Rückblick wenigstens ein bißchen……
    Du lässt uns das Geschehen wirklich hautnah miterleben, mit allen Gefühlen die wir wahrscheinlich auch gehabt hätten, Thanks!!!!!
    Beim lesen Deiner Eindrücke tauchte dann bei mir so ein Gefühl auf: jetzt weiß ich mal wieder ganz genau wieso ich *fangirle*, bestimmt nicht wegen des Bartes 😉

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    • Bitte gerne – für mich ist es ja auch immer schön, wenn ich sozusagen auf Armitages Trittbrett fahre 😀 War jetzt ein eher persönlicher Bericht, nicht so kritikartig wie eine Theaterkritik, aber dazu war eben die Podiumsdiskussion auch tendenziell eher persönlich und nicht theaterwissenschaftlich 🙂
      Und ja – ich kam da raus und dachte “Wow, er macht’s mir aber schwer, ihn *nicht* anzuhimmeln.” So ein toller Mann, in jeder Hinsicht. Ich fühle mich wie eine 17-Jährige, wenn ich das so schreibe, aber das Gefühl ist echt – er ist einfach hinreißend in seiner Ehrlichkeit, seinem Charme, mit seiner Stimme und seiner Präsenz. Aber eben dabei auch reflektiert und nicht oberflächlich, intelligent ohne abgehoben rüberzukommen. Ein ganz tolles Gesamtpaket.

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        • Ich bin sehr begeisterungsfähig :-D. Und habe “Freude am darstellerischen Spiel”. So stand das schon in meinem Zeugnis der zweiten Klasse. Hat sich nicht viel geändert. Geistig auch immer noch ungefähr acht Jahre alt. Aber das passt immer noch angesichts meiner Beschäftigung mit einem äußerst wohl artikulierten und überraschend hochgewachsenen Sechsjährigen 😀

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  4. Thank you for this, Guylty. I’m so pleased that you got to attend and to recount your impressions for us. “A whole blood actor” — what an evocative description! This is how I feel RA to be for me as well. His passion and methodology–both earthy and cerebral, towards building his John Proctor inspires me. I was trying to explain to some fans on Facebook that we don’t his need to worry about RA going deep into character and it’s not “unhealthy” to go deep. I just don’t get that sentiment. I feel there is some misunderstanding about the craft of the actor and you’ve touched on it. Anyway, having seen the play 2x, I now understand why the theater is a unique and exhilarating experience for both actor and audience. Each performance for me was an act of discovery with each character.

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  5. *seufz* Wieder was verpasst …

    Danke, Guylty. Was für ein Glück, dass gerade Abendessen-Zeit ist – da kann ich mein Frustfutter tarnen. 😉

    Wenn deine Spekulation im Absatz unter dem Blumenbild allerdings zutreffend sind, mache jetzt *ich* mir Gedanken, dass er doch noch durchdrehen könnte … *gg*

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    • Nö. Siehe oben. Ich glaube, der kann ganz gut erkennen, wo er aufhört und der Charakter anfängt. Dass er ihn nicht sofort rausschmeißt, nachdem die Vorstellung vorbei ist, kann ich gut nachvollziehen – man selber hat dem Stück und seinen Akteuren ja auch noch lange nach Fall des Vorhangs nachgesonnen. So’n bisschen hypersensibel isser aber bestimmt – aber muss er ja auch sein. Passt schon.

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    • Hi Helen! Glad to share it with you, too. Thanks again for giving me the opportunity to attend that special event. I will never forget it, or drinking coffee with you and other friends. Too much fun.

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    • I don’t think I have really thanked you enough for organising the seats for us, Helen. It was absolutely wonderful that we had seats in the stalls, and it was of course very comfy that the responsibility for procuring the tickets was that way taken off me *ggg*. You were really kind sharing your investment with us. (And giving me a morning of fun and getting to know you to boot.) xx

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    • My heart skips a bit seeing all you marvellous ladies assembled here again….. Goodness I’d love to go for a drink with you here and now! It had been such a wonderful meeting, getting to know Helen and Kathy (and therefore you getting a face! LOL), and sharing this magic short 45 min with Richard Armitage. Once again, a big, big thank you to Helen for organising the tickets, a big thank you to Guylty for getting me on board, and for writing this wonderfully compiled, and incredibly touching report of how you experienced this truly special event (you do have quite a formidable recollection!). Once more I’m almost in tears…wohoo, have we all been somewhat tizzy and besides ourselves of joy! Wasn’t there nearly a kind of lightheadedness that we felt?? …afterwards… such an urge to talk!! Miss you already..now, that everybody being at home again…all over this widespread RAworld…

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      • Yes, I felt positively giddy afterwards. It was just really nice hearing him talk so openly. And to think that he was comfortable with it all, enjoying the attention, even. But yes, the whole event wouldn’t have been what it was if it hadn’t been for all the lovely people I met that day. You are right – it would be so nice to be able to just meet up and sit down and chat. If this whole thing has taught me anything then it is to organise fan meets when I go to do an event like this again. BOTFA premiere anyone? London?
        As for formidable recollection – it’s called a notebook, Linda *ggg*. And back-up via transcript 😉

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  6. My goodness, Guylty, your powers of observation and note-taking are amazing. I was in a daze the entire time, the few thoughts I can remember are disjointed and trivial. Was he was sitting on a tiny red chair from the now notorious “I know what I’m selling,” interview? And it struck me as funny that they selected “random” questions submitted. Because if they are selected questions, can they be random? Did they print them out and pick them out of a hat? The cynic in me doubts it.Then my brain shut off completely. The entire event went by too fast. I was on RA overload mode and left with the general impression that topics were serious with politics mixed in, and no popcorn served. And I was still reeling from meeting you and other friends. Thrilling would be understating that experience.

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    • Yup – it was that type of chairs 🙂 A bit too fragile for Mr A, but luckily his impressive presence hid the tinkly, frilly chair 😀
      Powers of observation – hm, not sure. I had my notebook, so I could write stuff down, and I only jumbled all the stuff on paper that had in some way or other stuck in my mind. I completely ommitted the politics – thanks for reminding me – not consciously but because I didn’t really think it was all that noteworthy what he said. (Having said that – I was obviously not quite as involved as you in terms of his slightly unsuitable examples of 21st century totalitarian witch hunts 😀 ) Armitage’s opinions on politics in general are far too wishy-washy for my personal taste…
      The random questions – I couldn’t quite make out. It had passed me by that questions were to be submitted beforehand, anyway. And to me it sounded as if they had scanned the questions beforehand, sorted out all unsuitable ones, and then kind chose randomly from those which had been vetted? No personal stuff, really *aw*
      Thrilling it was – the whole day, with all of you, with RA. I wish we could all do that again, but I doubt the opportunity will arise. So glad we did it when we could.

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      • Me too. You never know, an opportunity may arise somehow. Maybe he will do another play we can attend. I feel so lucky we did have that time the universe gave us. It was amazing. The whole thing.

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          • Yes, got back late last night. Tracy came over this morning to receive her shrine. She literally cried because it was so beautiful and represented a special bond between we two RA fans. She will be thanking you BTS. She thinks it is the most beautiful one you have ever made (slightly prejudiced). The book you photographed it on is the current copy she has, and over the years, she has had many. RA and P & P, devastating combination.

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            • Ah, cool – what a great coincidence that she has the same edition of PP as me. I am glad if the RAPS is to her liking. And yes, there is a special bond reflected in it 🙂

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  7. You are a very lucky lady!! RA friends and the man himself! Love your observations. Thanks for sharing!! Esp. love Nutley Hill! Went down that road myself a loong time ago! 😀 😀

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    • Thanks Pat! Indeed the perfect combination, plus a beautiful summer day, sitting outside in cafés, no care in the world, holidaying. Beauty beauty beauty.
      Ha, that sounds straight from Nutley Hill again 😀 (I actually should have written “Nutley LANE” – that is actually the name of a road here in Dublin. Incidentally the road that the Irish state broadcaster sits on.) And no regrets – RA may have sent me down Nutley Hill, but I have met all those fellow nutters there, I really am in great company 😀

      Liked by 1 person

    • LOL :-)) Nice one, Barsine. Hey, I take any compliment I can get. Even if it is off the back of Armitage. (Has a nice back, that man, so it’s all good, I take compliments off his back. Would also take worries off his chest or weights off his shoulders if that means I am getting up close *ggg*)

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  8. Bin etwas später, war noch mit iphone-streicheln beschäftigt 😎
    Ich sass beim Lesen quasi auf deinem Schoss (das willst du nicht wirklich). Wenn man die Bestuhlung kennt, kriegt das nochmal einen besonderen Wiedererkennungseffekt. Die Stimme dann quasi aus dem RL-RA heraustönend stelle ich mir auch SEHR intensiv vor. Aber es ist schon so: das Gesamtpaket RA ist so dermassen schlüssig und einnehmend: Da muss man sich ja immer wieder neu verlieben. Und so kleine Schwächen, wie ein etwas absurder Musikgeschmack, fällt da grosszügig unter den Tisch. Jetzt hast du ihn ja auch schon in 4 Aggregatzuständen erlebt: roter Teppich, Theater, SD und Conversation. Sxx, das ist schon ein echtes Brett. Aber das weisst du ja. Wollte es nur nochmal chronologisch festhalten 🙂

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    • Soso, wieder gestreichelt *tuttuttut* Und ein neues Avatar eingestellt. Was isn das auf dem Bild? Deine Herzkurve nach dem iPhone-Streicheln? 😀
      LOL Bestuhlung allein schon wieder, das Wort. So deutsch. Und im Zusammenhang mit Wiedererkennungseffekt. ROFL.
      Gesamtpaket schlüssig. Sollte in Massenproduktion hergestellt werden, damit alle eins haben können. Am Musikgeschmack könnte ja ggf auch noch ein wenig gefeilt werden. Ist ja sozusagen erst Armitage v1.0.
      Wieso ist das mit den 4 Aggregatzuständen (köstlich!!!) übrigens ein Brett?

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      • Also mal von hinten: ein Brett ist, wenn man das erlebt, was du im Zusammenhang mit RA erlebt hast: nämlich ihn in 4 verschiedenen Situationen zu erlebt zu haben. Das ist schlicht endgeil (ich mag das Wort 🙂 )
        Der alte Avatar ging mir auf den Geist. Ständig das Gestarre….. Und ja Herzkurve, garnicht soooo schlecht 😀
        Aber das beste: eine Dame hier aus dem Kreis, die ich vertraulich über das Streichbild informiert habe, will jetzt auch ein iphone, aber nur: Achtung, wenn dann nach dem Streiche(l)n ein Nacktmull erscheint. Ich weiss nicht, ob sie die Untiefe dieses Wunsches umrissen hat? Mir schossen schier dienTränen der Begeisterung in die Augen 😀 😀 😀
        Das qualifiziert sie doch automatisch in unseren Spezialkreis, oder?

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        • Ah, danke für die Aufklärung.
          Und das mit Nacktmull nach Streichelbild – wieso, ist doch machbar. Da richtet man eben ein separates Hintergrundbild für den Normalbildschirm ein *achselzuck*. Wo ist das Problem?
          Aber man kann angesichts dieser technischen Naivität jedoch konstatieren, dass die Dame Potenzial hat. Wenn sie in der Lage ist, das hier ja doch schon recht weit fortgeschrittene Niveau Armitagscher Sozialstudien zu verarbeiten und evtl. sogar noch zu bereichern, dann willkommen.
          (PS – falls sie schon mitlesen sollte: Ich alberne nur rum. Bin nicht so arrogant wie ich hier rüberkomme! Nur Gefrozzel!)

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  9. In addition…it left the deepest impression on me to understand and witness how utterly immersed he seems in his role, however he distinctly appears highly content and at ease with his work. His sheer determination, (his joy!!) his immense abiltiy to concentrate so eagerly on his daily chores, his true fire and spirit that is always apparent and so clearly palpable, is nothing less than overwhelming. He (not only) really burns for his John Proctor.
    All this and him being all smiles. Irresistible. (Du hast das so wunderbar ausgedrückt in deinem Text!)
    Still I’m also no longer as worried as I had been at times, about his process of allowing the characters into his mind, life, body (as you’ve put it, Guylty). He obviously really knows how to handle this part of his job adequately, after all it’s his daily bread.
    There is one little thing that I find fairly interesting. In none of the so far published transcripts of the Conversation his reference to Pina Bausch is mentioned. As far as I remember he cited her when he was asked about the rehearsals with Ms Farber and how she/they had approached the play. This is probably something rather personal for me, for I repeatedly had thought about it in the past ,whether (as a former dancer) he would know about her work and if he has ever had the chance to see her or her company dancing. Therefore I was especially delighted when he referred to her as an inspiration for them during their rehearsal process for The Crucible.

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    • No, I think you are right, Linda. He did mention Pina Bausch in the conversation. I remember that because my latent nationalism *eeeek* was piqued by that. Unfortunately I am totally unclued about dance theatre/ballet and have no idea what his reference might have meant.
      The linked transcript by Film and TV Now also omits another part of the conversation – his examples of how TC is relevant to today. He kind of put himself out there with some references to Guantanamo Bay, I think, and mentioned the Patriot Act. Again, I am unfortunately not up-to-date with those topics, and can’t really recall anything except thinking that his references were a bit skewed. Kathy and I had a little discussion about it, and all I could remember was that somehow the Patriot Act reference was kind of off…

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  10. Thank you for sharing your impressions about this conversation and about Richard! It is very helpful to figure him after I saw The Crucible. And I very much agree with you: “what makes the man so attractive is not his chest hair or his peaches or his smoulder. It’s all the other attributes first. “

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  11. As I was reading your description, I thought “this man is a pro.” And then you confirmed it in your own words! Love the picture of your journal and ticket. Such things are so precious. Also the photo with the spring flowers had an impact. Thanks for including that 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Pingback: (Collectively) DeRAnged Part 5: Fan Meets Galore | GUYLTY PLEASURE

  13. Pingback: deRAnged Part 7: Stage Door Survived | GUYLTY PLEASURE

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