Epic Fail – Pulled Previous Post

Wow. There’s an epic fail if ever there was one. I think I have just proven that my history credentials are invalid. My musings on a “future project in Ireland” were fundamentally flawed – I chose the wrong century. Jeepers Creepers. Rookie mistake. The post is pulled – to be confined to the vaults of shame.

Forget all I wrote (in case you read it). The search for a possible “true story set in Ireland in the 1800s” begins again. And I’ll keep out of it.

Thanks to kaprekar for pointing out my mistake.

39 thoughts on “Epic Fail – Pulled Previous Post

  1. Or you could blame it on Richard Armitage’s penchant for mixing up his centuries, as he seems to have done with Pilgrimage. My latest gaff – I posted screencaps of the LA Premiere, only to be told they were from the London Premiere.

    Like

    • 😀 Phew – I am kind of glad I am not the only one who occasionally loses the plot. The funny thing is that I had some sort of confusion regarding the centuries before I even started writing the post – and then I obviously settled for the wrong one. DUH!

      Like

  2. The centuries mixup thing is incredibly common (says the former history professor). Almost the only people who don’t do it at least from time to time are professionals.

    Like

      • At least you’re not Italian — the Cinquecento being the sixteenth century in English. Conferences with Italian scholars get very confusing from time to time.

        Like

        • It is indeed confusing.
          In my case, it teaches an important lesson also: Shut your mouth until you have enough information to base any speculation on. Ah well, it was beautiful for as long as it lasted *ggg*

          Like

  3. I loved your post. I got a little taste of Irish history that I was clueless about. And I had great visuals in my head of RA emoting in beautiful death scenes in moldy, cold prison cells. I have a new speculation for you. How about a remake of “Captain Boycott”? It fits the timeline (maybe, now I am confused) and had a dashing hero in Stewart Granger. Maybe it’s time for a remake and reminder that “boycotting” was born in Ireland. Just a thought.

    Like

      • That was the name of the movie, but the hero was the guy that thought of the tactic to use against Capt. Boycott and led his neighbors to victory. So RA would be the hero (like Stewart Granger) who triumphs against the evil Capt. Boycott. At least that is how the movie goes. It is a shame that the word boycott came from the bad guy, not the good guy.

        Like

  4. I’m sorry to be the one who pointed that out. Anyway didn’t he say in another interview that he didn’t want to say what it was exactly in case someone else pinched the idea is something – maybe we should just wait and see.

    Like

  5. I have not read it, when you have published it I was making a time travel to 1992 re-watching for the 20th time “Bram Stoker’s Dracula” 😀

    But, who has not mistaken ever a century throweth the first stone 🙂

    Like

    • *ggg* Good one, Barsine – yes, it happens very easily. It happened while I was initially making notes – and then I obviously took the wrong turn even though the mix-up had occurred to me. Grah. Ah well.
      Bram Stoker’s Dracula – ah, now, there is another angle. While Dracula has been done to death, Stoker really hasn’t…

      Like

  6. I think it’s an understandable mistake, you were probably subconsciously thinking “18th century” instead of “1800s”. nevertheless, it was an interesting history lesson 😀

    Like

  7. Well, as a huge fan of the 18th century, I adored the post! I would love to see Mr. A. as any of those extremely interesting men (BTW I did not realize Edmund Burke was Irish–very cool.) Now that I am listening to “Clarissa,” the thought of him in a frock coat with plenty of gold braid and long lacy shirtsleeves is quite appealing. Of course he might have to wear a powdered wig, but I think he would look very distinguished 🙂

    Like

    • The 18th century is so exciting – well, revolutions have that kind of impact, I suppose, and produce heroes. The longer I think about it, the clearer it is to me that I was completely thrown off the path by my own infatuation with Lord Edward FitzGerald. Read a biography about him years ago – and boy, he had everything you want in a hero: aristocratic background, but becomes a progressive thinker, hugely romantic love-life, exciting involvement in moments of history – and dying a hero/martyr. Honestly, I have cannot see how there is anything at the end of the 18th century that could match this. (I think I am on to something here… maybe I should get down to it and write a screenplay for a Wolfe Tone-Lord Edward biopic. RA gets to play Lord Edward, but who shall I give Wolfe Tone to? Gerard Butler maybe?)
      Re. Burke and Irish – well, the Irish themselves like to claim him as one of ours, but by his own admission he considered himself an Englishman. Brings to mind the old adage by the Duke of Wellington: “Just because one is born in a stable, doesn’t make one a horse” – oh, by the by: Wellington was born in a house a few meters down from the hotel where you and I had our tea, Linnet!!!
      On the other end of the spectrum, here is an anecdote from my own experience: Upon getting to know my future in-laws (who hail from the Anglo-Irish stratum of society, i.e. their ancestors came to Ireland in the 18th century (this time the real one) and were Protestants), I said something along the lines of “So they felt loyal to England?” – oh boy, was I put straight… NO! They assimilated very quickly and considered themselves Irish… After that gaffe I can consider myself lucky to have been welcomed into my family-in-law *chuckles*)
      Powdered wigs – ugh, yes, definite turn off. In that respect I really favour a late 19th century story *ggg*.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Well, the portrait of Lord Edward that you showed revealed quite clearly that he was a heartbreakingly handsome man.
        That is very interesting about your in-laws. I think it was in that film about the Lennox sisters that they showed how people in London looked down on those who lived in Ireland as though they were poor relations in a barbaric land. That would have quickly caused the Anglo-Irish to band together and create an Irish identity. I suspect it was mainly in the North in the context of the Troubles that loyalty to England came to the fore. But then the Anglo-Irish upper class must have experienced terrible conflicts during the civil war. I need to read up on this.
        Wellington, now that’s another fine looking man! Again, I had no idea he was Irish!!!

        Like

        • Hehe, well, as he said – he was born in Ireland but English 😀
          Ireland has always been perceived as a land of uncultured peasants, I suppose, and your interpretation makes sense. The whole loyalty to England issue is mixed up with class issues, really.

          Liked by 1 person

  8. I would love to have read it, wrong century and all. I have lots of memories of Irish castles and ruins that I could revisit with much pleasure. :). Unfortunately when a password is asked for I don’t seem to have one, have tried all my options. I think when I subscribed to WordPress all it asked for was a username and email.

    Like

Let me know what you think!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s