Holiday Reading with Richard Armitage

Are you on your great big summer holiday yet? If not, there is still time to prepare yourself and bring along some gripping literature to while away an afternoon sunbathing on your lounger or on the beach. The soft velvet tones of Richard reading an intriguing thriller for an audio book are favoured by many a fan. For those who still rely on their eyes for holiday literature, I have a handy list of recommended reading: Did you know that Richard Armitage is a prolific writer whose oeuvre stretches from 19th century courtroom drama to 21st century beauty tips? You’ve heard it here first! There is sure to be a book that will also match *your* taste in books.

Richard’s Recommended Reading

1. Set in the cut-throat world of British banking, the bank clerk Richard Armitage is put on trial for forgery. Accused by two witnesses, Armitage is found guilty – and hanged at Old Bailey. A true story.

 

2. In line with his continuous sermon on empathy, Richard also has sympathy for the accusers. In his 2017 late work, Armitage discusses police suicide and how to prevent it.

3. Let’s get away from it all. Richard loves travelling; particularly in Korea. His Travel and Transport Guide is a must-read for anyone who wants to make optimum use of public transport facilities. Chapters include celebrity-proof hints and tricks to avoid fangirls in airports and how-to lists on looking at one’s personal best after 15 hours of flying.

4. Who doesn’t remember Richard’s extra-friendly welcome at the TV interview prior to the 2013 Hobbit premiere in Madrid? Little did we know, that when Richard went out of his way to say bye-bye to the camera man by hand-shake, Richard had fluent Spanish gesturing to accompany his departure. Proving that every language course should start with a lesson on culture, Richard teaches Beginning Spanish with a cultural approach.

5. With Brexit now more or less an inevitability, Richard is re-publishing his spite-project on Transnational Projects. Since his film production company is nearly in place, Armitage has added new chapters on “Getting Funding in Europe”, “Getting a Bang out of your Pound in Europe”, and “Getting Laid in Europe”.

6. And finally and most topically of all, Armitage writes a self-help book that should be mandatory for the fashion-conscious modern man.

However…

If you are not quite convinced by the above list although it is authentic – albeit not with *our* Richard Armitage – and you are still looking for some holiday reading, I have randomly picked a few recommendations that also appeared when I searched on Amazon.

  • The intriguingly named Ella Armitage writes about The Beginnings of English History. Definitely something that history buff Armitage would enjoy.

  • Less intriguingly named but already a firm fan favourite, Trudy Brasure is a fan-turned-writer. Her classic contribution to the NS canon is her retelling of the Gaskell novel, entitled In Consequence. Tried and tested, has my seal of approval 😉

  • Lastly, do you want to read about fangirling as it really is? Written by a fan herself, Abby Vegas takes a look at the Richard Armitage fandom, from the perspective of a fan. Yes, there *are* books about us out there 😂

PS

This post is a nod to Kate who has just written a fun post in her series on the RCA Armitage Dictionary. Read about Armitage disambiguation HERE.

PPS

Should you feel inclined to buy any of the above mentioned books, don’t forget to use RAnet‘s charity links to Amazon. Amazon USAmazon DE, and Amazon UK .

16 thoughts on “Holiday Reading with Richard Armitage

  1. – Le meilleur moment est toujours la découverte de la première et la quatrième de couverture. J’adore le cuir et le carton épais…
    J’adore aussi l’odeur du parchemin et des feuilles fabriquées une à une avec de la pâte à papier, incrustée de fleurs, …
    – Reste que l’introduction et la conclusion doivent être excellentes. J’ai toujours eu du mal à conclure mes thèses, mes articles, mes courriers …
    – J’aime beaucoup les dédicaces, certaines sont incongrues. Voici l’une de celles que je pourrais écrire: “A mes chats, qui m’accompagnent en jouant sur mon clavier d’ordinateur…”
    – Les fautes d’orthographes et de syntaxes sont rédhibitoires. Mes enfants font appel à moi. Alors que je fais toujours appel à ma maman âgée aujourd’hui de 89 ans…
    – Je déteste les traductions qui dénaturent le texte ou qui rendent les phrases lourdes, absconses…
    – Les références bibliographiques peuvent indiquer la valeur des recherches de l’écrivain. Dans un livre de diététique pour diabétiques, écrit par un confrère infirmier, j’ai découvert une référence biblio sur le clitoris !!! Ensuite, il était difficile pour mes collègues et moi de le croiser, sans se moquer intérieurement…

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    • That sounds like a love letter to reading, Squirrel. Yes, there is something very familiar and homely about the sound, and feel, and smell of paper. Opening a new book, I often find it slightly daunting. A lot of ground to cover. But if it is a good book, then I start regretting that it will be over, even before I reach the last quarter.
      Like you I am not a great fan of translations. I rarely read books that have been written in a language that I cannot read. Which means I have to limit myself to German and English. Reading a translated book from English to German, usually drives me mad because I tend to pick out little tell-tale mistakes – well, only if there *are* mistakes, of course.
      LOL on your colleagues bibliography on the clitoris…

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  2. Many thanks for your reading recommendations which brought a big smile to my face! As a member of Team Hairpiece, it goes without saying that I’m instinctively drawn to Richard Armitage’s Ultimate Hair Secrets! You could not make it up! 😃

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